Connect with us

Health

Tips to stay hydrated and healthy during Ramadan

Published

 on

(Last Updated On: April 18, 2021)

During Ramadan, Muslims abstain from food and drink from dawn to dusk but it is important to get proper nourishment between Iftar and Sahari in order to be prepared for the next day – especially for those who need to work and go to school or university.

Healthy habits during the holy month are also very important in order to avoid gaining weight.

Cleveland Medical Center in Abu Dhabi, in the UAE, reports that there are a few simple times to help you stay fit while fasting.

Stay hydrated

The amount of fluids a person needs depends on age, gender, climate and activity level.

According to Cleveland Clinic, adults, on average, need 2 to 3 liters of water each day. So make sure to drink plenty of fluids before the start of the fasting hours. Unsweetened juices or milk are tasty, low calorie alternatives.

Experts warn against too much coffee and tea and soda drinks outside of fasting hours as the caffeine in them causes increased urination. Cleveland Clinic recommends these drinks be limited during the non-fasting hours.

The clinic also suggests that meals are started with broths, soups or stews. Fruits and vegetables such as watermelon, squash or spinach are mostly water and can also help to replace fluids.

Why is this important?

As stated by the clinic, the human body is about 60 percent water and it is vital for bodily functions, including metabolizing and transporting nutrients throughout the body and removing waste.

The amount of water in the body fluctuates – it is lost through urine and sweat and regained from food and drinks.

However, Cleveland Clinic states it is not unusual to become periodically dehydrated while fasting. Dehydration can result in weight loss that is quickly regained when normal eating and drinking habits resume.

Choose healthy options

Hunger tempts us to indulge or eat fast, convenient foods. But according to the Cleveland Clinic, highly processed foods are high in salt, sugar and unhealthy fats, which won’t last long and can increase thirst.

Try a handful of roasted nuts instead of ready-to-eat foods and also try to eat fresh fruit and vegetables.

Eat, rest and exercise strategically

According to clinic experts, planning your activities and meals after breaking your fast will help to refuel you and prepare you for the next day of fasting.

Rest is important, but be sure to stay awake long enough to replenish the fluids and nutrients your body needs.

Eat balanced meals including: bread, cereals and other grains; fruits and vegetables; meat, fish and poultry; milk, yogurt or cheese; and healthy fats.

Focus on foods that are digested slowly and release energy over time. These include food that are high in fiber (e.g. whole grains, fruits and vegetables) and foods containing complex carbohydrates (wheat, beans, lentils, rice, etc.).

It is important to stay active too. Find time to take a walk or do some gentle stretching.

Why is this important?

Weight loss occurs when a person uses more energy than they consume. Some studies on weight loss/gain during Ramadan have shown that energy intake remains the same or increases, despite a decrease in meal frequency.

Health

Pollution likely to cut 9 years of life expectancy of 40% of Indians

Published

on

(Last Updated On: September 1, 2021)

Air pollution is likely to reduce the life expectancy of about 40% of Indians by more than nine years, according to a report released by a U.S. research group on Wednesday.

More than 480 million people living in the vast swathes of central, eastern and northern India, including the capital, New Delhi, endure significantly high pollution levels, said the report prepared by the Energy Policy Institute at the University of Chicago (EPIC).

“Alarmingly, India’s high levels of air pollution have expanded geographically over time,” the EPIC report said.

For example, air quality has significantly worsened in the western state of Maharashtra and the central state of Madhya Pradesh, it said.

Lauding India’s National Clean Air Program (NCAP), launched in 2019 to rein in dangerous pollution levels, the EPIC report said “achieving and sustaining” the NCAP goals would raise the country’s overall life expectancy by 1.7 years and that of New Delhi 3.1 years, Reuters reported.

The NCAP aims to reduce pollution in the 102 worst-affected cities by 20%-30% by 2024 by ensuring cuts in industrial emissions and vehicular exhaust, introducing stringent rules for transport fuels and biomass burning and reduce dust pollution. It will also entail better monitoring systems.

New Delhi was the world’s most polluted capital for the third straight year in 2020, according to IQAir, a Swiss group that measures air quality levels based on the concentration of lung-damaging airborne particles known as PM2.5.

Last year, New Delhi’s 20 million residents, who breathed some of the cleanest air on record in the summer because of coronavirus lockdown curbs, battled toxic air in winter following a sharp increase in farm residue burning in the nearby states of Punjab and Haryana, Reuters reported.

According to the EPIC’s findings, neighbouring Bangladesh could raise average life expectancy by 5.4 years if the country improves air quality to levels recommended by the World Health Organization.

To arrive at the life expectancy number, EPIC compared the health of people exposed to different levels of long-term air pollution and applied the results to various places in India and elsewhere.

Continue Reading

Health

WHO concerned about worsening access in Afghanistan

Published

on

(Last Updated On: July 9, 2021)

The World Health Organization is concerned about worsening access to provide life-saving medicines and supplies in Afghanistan and attacks on health care facilities, as Afghan forces fight Taliban insurgents, a WHO official said on Friday.

Rick Brennan, WHO regional emergencies director for its Eastern Mediterranean regional office, said that aid supplies would arrive next week including 3.5 million COVID-19 vaccine doses and oxygen concentrators.

“It is a terribly concerning situation and it’s very fluid right now,” Brennan, speaking from Cairo, told a U.N. briefing in Geneva. “We are concerned about our lack of access to be able to provide essential medicines and supplies and we are concerned about attacks on health care.”

Continue Reading

Health

China reports first ever human case of H10N3 bird flu

Published

on

(Last Updated On: June 1, 2021)

A 41-year-old man in China’s eastern province of Jiangsu has been confirmed as the first human case of infection with the H10N3 strain of bird flu, China’s National Health Commission (NHC) said on Tuesday.

Reuters reported the man, a resident of the city of Zhenjiang, was hospitalised on April 28 after developing a fever and other symptoms, the NHC said in a statement.

He was diagnosed as having the H10N3 avian influenza virus on May 28, it said, but did not give details on how the man had been infected with the virus.

The man was stable and ready to be discharged from hospital. Medical observation of his close contacts had not found any other cases, Reuters reported.

H10N3 is a low pathogenic, or relatively less severe, strain of the virus in poultry and the risk of it spreading on a large scale was very low, the NHC added.

The strain is “not a very common virus,” said Filip Claes, regional laboratory coordinator of the Food and Agriculture Organization’s Emergency Centre for Transboundary Animal Diseases at the Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific, Reuters reported.

Only around 160 incidents of the virus were reported in the 40 years to 2018, mostly in wild birds or waterfowl in Asia and some limited parts of North America, and none had been detected in chickens so far, he added.

No other cases of human infection with H10N3 have previously been reported globally, the NHC said.

Continue Reading
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement

Trending

Copyright © 2021 Ariana News. All rights reserved!