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Only Russia Can Help Afghanistan: Karzai

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(Last Updated On: April 9, 2018)

Former President Hamid Karzai has said that Russia is the only force which can help Afghanistan fight terrorism.

In an interview with Russian news channel, the ex-president said, “I understand perfectly well that if you [Russia] build new relations with Pakistan and Afghanistan, you can help us. Not the Britons as we kicked them out of the country several times, not the Americans as they’ve been killing us for 17 years, but Russia only. We [Afghanistan] are the last barrier from terrorists. We’ve been fighting continuously for a century and a half.”

“Moscow has always helped us, even when its forces invaded Afghanistan at the invitation of then-president Babrak Karmal. We surely fought each other at those times, but you [Russia] used to build schools and hospitals in Afghanistan.”

He alleged: “Americans lie when they say that Al-Qaeda emerged as the result of your [Russia’s] invasion. They wanted to be the only superpower and they did it. The USSR collapsed and one of the reasons was the Afghan war.”

For all requests to explain its actions, the US answered with neutral phrases, like “in order to defend stability in the region,” Karzai explained, adding that he had decided to resign after he had come up with the idea that Afghanistan was just being used.

“People used to come to me continuously from four different provinces, saying that foreigners had come by unidentified choppers to kick them out of their building and kill them. The foreigners are much more dangerous, they called themselves ‘the caliphate.’ There are several thousands of them now in Afghanistan,” the ex-president said.

At the same time, Karzai noted that Afghanistan’s airspace was “fully controlled by the Americans.”

“Nothing flies without their permission. They have mercenaries in Afghanistan with their own army, aviation and security service. I tried to kick them out of the country, but I failed,” Karzai concluded.

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Talks team deadlock broken, as both sides agree to initial roadmap

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(Last Updated On: November 23, 2020)

In a major step forward, the talks teams for the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan and the Taliban have agreed on four key issues as the basis for talks going forward.

This comes after a deadlock of more than a month, following the start of talks on September 12 in Doha.

According to sources in Doha, the two sides agreed to include the US-Taliban deal, UN endorsements for Afghan peace process, the will of the Afghan people and commitments of the negotiating teams as the foundation of talks going forward.

“We do not underestimate these challenges, no matter how difficult they may be. But we have reason not to be disappointed. For all our differences, the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan is committed to a positive approach to peace,” said Sayed Sadat Mansour Naderi, minister of peace affairs.

The negotiating team of the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan says that the two negotiating parties will announce their declarations of agreement and the finalization of the procedure.

On the other hand, the head of the negotiating team of the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan Massom Stanikzai says that the Taliban’s lack of flexibility has made the path to peace difficult.

“Unfortunately, the Taliban’s short-sightedness has made this difficult. Continuing meaningful dialogue to reach a common vision is the shortest way to peace. This fact requires patience, caution and public consensus,” said Stanikzai.

The head of the negotiating team of the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan has been in Kabul for the past few days to consult with the leadership of the government and to get the final approval of the negotiating council of the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan.

The delegation is optimistic that progress in the Doha talks will pave the way for a ceasefire sooner rather than later.

“Ending the violence during the talks is the first proposal ordered to build public confidence. Recently, when the talks began, the Afghan people witnessed a dramatic increase in violence,” said Fawzia Kofi, a member of the negotiating team.

It is however not yet clear whether the delegations will negotiate on a ceasefire first, once talks get underway, or on the future of a political system.

As much as the Afghan Republic’s team want to focus on a ceasefire, the Taliban want the political future to be the starting point.

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Taliban strongholds in Pakistan give group platform to wage war: NDS

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(Last Updated On: November 23, 2020)

Ahmad Zia Saraj, the acting head of the national directorate of security (NDS), said Monday that because the Taliban has active and secure strongholds in Pakistani cities, the group has been able to intensify the conflict in Afghanistan.

Saraj said this was enabling the Taliban to continue a proxy war.

Saraj stressed that the region’s intelligence policy towards Afghanistan has not changed and that regional countries are trying to achieve a system that the Taliban want.

“Taliban safe havens in Quetta, Karachi and Peshawar are safely plotting every day to challenge us, and in their plans our people are killed, and if the Taliban leadership did not have safe places in these cities they [Taliban] would be facing a bad fate,” Saraj said.

Meanwhile, the acting NDS chief stressed that the Taliban had not cut contact with al-Qaeda and that many terrorist groups were colluding with the group to pursue one goal – which is to destabilize Afghanistan and kill people.

“The Taliban’s relationship with foreign terrorists continues on a regular basis, and terrorist groups are using each other’s capabilities, which has led to an increase in the conflict, and these groups are buying and selling suicide bombers, and all groups are pursuing the same goal, killing people, destroying values and establishing a system,” Saraj added.

Saraj also said that the Taliban does not believe in the peace process.

“If the Taliban was committed to peace, we should have seen results from the talks, and it can be seen that they are not interested in peace and they only want a regime according to their wishes, and if they were committed, they would not increase the violence,” Saraj said.

However, the NDS emphasizes that the only way to reduce the level of violence in Afghanistan is to create and cooperate on a “real” regional consensus basis.

He said conflict of interest among regional countries has resulted in a more widespread war in Afghanistan.

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Shocking data finds 5 Afghan children killed or maimed every day

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(Last Updated On: November 23, 2020)

A new study has found at least 26,025 children have been killed or maimed in war-ravaged Afghanistan in the past 14 years – an average of five children every day.

The shocking findings, released by Save the Children, has spurred the organization on to join calls for increased humanitarian funding from donor countries at this week’s pledging conference in Geneva.

According to a statement issued by Save the Children, the study took into account child victims due to conflict between 2005 and 2019. The organization also stated that the COVID-19 pandemic has further exacerbated the crisis for children.

The UN estimates that currently, seven million children are in need of urgent help in Afghanistan.

Save the Children reported that between between 2017 and 2019 there were more than 300 attacks on schools, injuring or killing at least 410 students and teachers.

The organization stated that 93 percent of late primary school-aged children are not proficient in reading and 60 percent of school-aged children missing out on their education are girls,

The organization also stated that spending on education is presently 78 percent less than the average for the South Asia region and that 14 million people, nearly 50 percent of the country’s population, need humanitarian assistance.

In addition, more than seven million children are at risk of hunger just this year, three million children under the age of five suffer from under-nutrition and the UN’s humanitarian appeal is currently only 42 percent funded.

Chris Nyamandi, Save the Children’s Country Director in Afghanistan, said: “Imagine living with the constant fear that today might be the day that your child is killed in a suicide attack or an airstrike. This is the grim reality for tens of thousands of Afghan parents whose children have been killed or injured.

“The COVID-19 pandemic has added to children’s misery and must be addressed with new funding. But as the humanitarian needs rise higher than ever, it is a struggle to secure the funds needed to help people.

“This week’s conference is a crucial moment for donor governments to reaffirm their support to Afghanistan and its millions of children, at a time when it is needed more than ever,” said Mr Nyamandi.

As the 2020 Afghanistan Conference starts in Geneva, Save the Children called on the international community to increase funding for education, especially for girls, as well as protect the interests of people with disabilities and other vulnerable groups; increase spending on public health to support children, many of whom are having to live with life-altering injuries due to being caught up in the conflict; work with the government of Afghanistan to ensure national laws related to the protection of children are fully resourced and rolled out nationwide; secure an enduring peace settlement so that future generations grow up free from the fear of violence and death.

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