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COVID-19

More than 8 million Afghan children in need of life-saving support

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(Last Updated On: June 13, 2020)

Save the Children says the outbreak of the Coronavirus has increased the number of children in need of humanitarian assistance in Afghanistan.

Save the Children – an international organization for children protection – says that the number of Afghan children in need of help to survive before the outbreak of the Coronavirus was 5 million, while it has risen by about 3 million since the beginning of 2020.

Maryam Ataei, a spokeswoman for Save the Children, said that with the prevalence of Covid-19 in Afghanistan four out of every ten children need humanitarian assistance.

She added that more than 5 million children were already in need of assistance in 2020, however with the outbreak of the Coronavirus, the figure reached 8.12 million children.

Therefore, Save the Children calls for serious attention from the Afghan government and the international community.

However, the Ministry of Labor and Social Affairs denies the statistics noting that there are nearly 6 million vulnerable children in Afghanistan, and the ministry has taken special measures to pick children from the streets for the Coronavirus period.

Ghulam Haidar Jailani, deputy head of social affairs at the ministry, said, “We have decided to collect all children from streets and accommodate them in the kindergartens that have been on lockdown, and if possible, we will help them reunite with their families.”

The Coronavirus has posed a special threat to Afghan labor children who have been wandering the streets looking for food day-to-day.

The figures provided by the Ministry of Labor and Social Affairs, and the United Nations in Afghanistan are as follows:

  • There are more than 6 million vulnerable children in Afghanistan, of which 3.7 million are deprived of school.
  • There are more than 2 million labor children, 1.2 million of whom are busy doing hard jobs.
  • More than 100,000 children are disabled and over 100,000 others are orphans and homeless.

On the other hand, early this year, the General Director of Social Affairs of Tehran Municipality announced the preparation of a list of Afghan labor children who are to be returned to Afghanistan; the reason given is that these children can further spread the Coronavirus in Tehran.

COVID-19

COVID-19 cases close to 41 million in US, hospitals overwhelmed

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(Last Updated On: September 12, 2021)

The cumulative total of confirmed COVID-19 cases in the United States surpassed 40.92 million on Saturday, with the death toll exceeding 659,000 and COVID-19 hospitalizations topping 100,000 due to raging highly contagious Delta variant.

This has pushed health systems in many states to limit, Reuters reported.

The country’s case count stood at 40,920,379 as of Saturday, with the death toll reaching 659,675, according to the Center for Systems Science and Engineering (CSSE) at Johns Hopkins University.

Health systems in the United States, especially those with low vaccination rates, are trying to deal with hiking hospitalizations as the nationwide total topped 100,000 as of September 9, with 26,000 patients being treated in intensive care units, according to the United States Department of Health and Human Services (HHS).

Hospitals across the U.S. are facing mounting pressure, with the national average of intensive-care unit availability at just 20 percent. Medical resources in many regions are in short supply, and medical staff are overwhelmed.

St Anthony’s Hospital in Florida is one of 15 hospitals in the area that has seen a tenfold increase in hospitalizations since July, and 85 percent of its patients have not been vaccinated against COVID-19, according to the hospital’s president.

Doctors at the hospital also said that unvaccinated infected patients are more likely to suffer more serious conditions and need to be kept alive by a ventilator. The patients usually want to make a phone call with their family members before intubation. Unfortunately, this is often their final goodbye to their families.

An intensive care nurse at the hospital said that, as a health care worker, she thought she could “survive the epidemic without vaccination,” but the raging epidemic has forced her to change her attitude and choose to get vaccinated.

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COVID-19

Australia’s New South Wales records highest COVID-19 daily caseload

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(Last Updated On: September 11, 2021)

Australia’s New South Wales state, the epicentre of the country’s latest coronavirus outbreak, reported 1,599 new locally acquired COVID-19 infections on Saturday, its biggest one-day rise in the pandemic.

New South Wales, in which its largest city of Sydney has been under strict stay-at-home orders for nearly three months, said a further eight people died, Reuters reported.

A four-stage national reopening plan unveiled by the federal government in July aims to relax several tough curbs once the country reaches a 70-80% immunization target from 40% now.

Australia has now recorded nearly 73,000 COVID-19 cases and a death toll of 1,084.

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COVID-19

What you need to know about the coronavirus right now

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(Last Updated On: September 8, 2021)

Here’s what you need to know about the coronavirus right now, Reuters reports.

New Zealand marks downward trend in new COVID-19 cases

New Zealand reported a further fall in locally acquired COVID-19 cases on Wednesday, as the largely coronavirus-free nation looks to eradicate an outbreak of the highly infectious Delta variant.

Officials earlier this week said schools, offices and businesses can reopen outside Auckland from Wednesday after near-zero cases in the rest of the country, but there will be a cap on gatherings and masks will remain mandatory in public venues.

Biden to outline plan to curb coronavirus Delta variant

US President Joe Biden on Thursday will present a six-pronged strategy intended to fight the spread of the Delta variant and increase US COVID-19 vaccinations, the White House said on Tuesday.

A White House official familiar with the plan said it would touch on mandates, testing, and schools. The official added the private sector could do more on the issue and that Biden would take on vaccine hesitancy as well.

Vaccinations accelerate in Australia

Three-quarters of people over the age of 16 in Australia’s New South Wales (NSW) have now had at least their first vaccination dose, the state reported on Wednesday, along with the first rise in new infections in three days.

As it prepares to emerge from lockdowns in its two biggest cities, the government is considering the use of vaccination certificates for international travel from October, the Sydney Morning Herald said in a report without citing a source. Australians are banned from leaving the country unless they have exemptions, while returning travellers must undergo a two-week hotel quarantine at their own expense.

US CDC warns against, and eases, travel ratings

The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) on Tuesday warned against travel to Sri Lanka, Jamaica and Brunei because of the rising number of COVID-19 cases, raising its travel advisory for these countries to “Level 4: Very High”.

The CDC also eased its ratings for the Netherlands, Malta, Guinea-Bissau and United Arab Emirates from “Level 4: Very High” to “Level 3: High,” urging unvaccinated Americans to avoid travel there. It also raised Australia from “Level 1: Low” to “Level 2: Moderate.”

Mask war marks first weeks of school in Florida

Parents in Florida and across the United States have clashed with school and health officials in what has become a politicized tussle over COVID precautions.

Two small districts in Florida that did not require masks have had to shut down because of soaring COVID cases. Staff shortages stemming from illness or quarantine have led to overcrowding on buses and larger class sizes, making social distancing harder, Florida Education Association President Andrew Spar said.

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