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Finland’s FM warns against ‘donor fatigue’ at upcoming Geneva summit

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(Last Updated On: October 31, 2020)

The Finnish Foreign Minister Pekka Haavisto said on Friday the world must not forget about Afghanistan nor allow for “donor fatigue” during next month’s pledging summit in Geneva.  

Delivering a speech at the Center for Conflict and Humanitarian Studies at the Doha Institute for Graduate Studies, Haavisto said: “As the international donors prepare for the conference in Geneva in November this year, our message to the donors will be not to forget Afghanistan. 

“We all need peace in Afghanistan, particularly the neighboring countries like Iran, Pakistan and India.

“They all agree that the peace in Afghanistan is necessary for them also,” he said. 

“Our battle while preparing for the conference is to convince the donors to commit for the development in Afghanistan. There should be no donor fatigue,” he said adding that “unfortunately the aid has not come for all areas in the country.”

Referring to the ongoing peace talks in Doha between the Afghan government representatives and the Taliban, and Qatar’s role in hosting the negotiations, Haavisto said: “This is very important phase of the process taking place here. The role of Qatar in bringing the parties together is appreciable. There are always people who promote cynicism whenever there are peace negotiations. I am however hopeful for the success of the ongoing process.”

Responding to a question about inclusivity in the peace talks of all sectors of society, Haavisto said: “I will try and make sure that the issue of including women and minorities in the donors’ conference. I always say that women and youth are very important stakeholders in any peacemaking attempt. The education for Afghan women is a key issue.”

Finland will co-host next month’s donor conference which aims to commit the Afghan government and the international community to shared development objectives for 2021-2024 as well as ensure financial support for the Afghan administration.

But unlike previous donor conferences, this year Afghan officials and international donors will face a changed situation. In the past, the focus has been on tying financial assistance to government reform amid an ongoing war with the Taliban. 

This year, peace talks are underway with the Taliban and government and a new Afghanistan could lie ahead but when officials and donors meet, they will face a changed, more fragile situation and the outcome of the summit is uncertain, 

In a recent analysis by the United States Institute of Peace, the organization stated the donor conference “could effectively promote development and peace in Afghanistan, or it could turn out to be counterproductive. 

“That will depend on whether participants come together and focus on a four-year development and peace framework or allow the meeting to be hijacked by one of several conflicting agendas that might undermine the peace process.”

More than 70 nations and organizations will attend the conference – countries and organizations that share an interest in Afghanistan’s development.  

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Govt rolls out curfew in 31 provinces to curb Taliban activities

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(Last Updated On: July 24, 2021)

The Afghan government announced Saturday it has imposed a curfew in 31 provinces around the country in a bid to curb Taliban activity.

According to the Ministry of Interior’s deputy spokesman Ahmad Zia Zia, the curfew will come into effect immediately and will be enforced from 10pm to 4am. 

Kabul, Nangarhar and Panjshir provinces are the only three that have been exempt. 

“Based on the security [situation] officials announced a curfew in 31 provinces; the decision was taken to prevent Taliban activities,” said Zia.

Meanwhile, residents of Kapisa province said that a number of families have been displaced due to clashes between Afghan forces and Taliban in Nijrab, Alasay and Tagab districts.

“Due to the war between ANDSF and Taliban in Nijrab, Alasay and Tagab districts, many of the residents of the districts have been displaced. We want to know what government intends to do about this,” said Shamila Mashal, a civil society activist.

In addition to these districts, heavy clashes have been ongoing between ANDSF and Taliban in Ghazni, Wardak, Takhar, Kunduz, Kunar, Laghman, Herat, Helmand and Nimruz provinces.

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Commander of US, NATO forces in Afghanistan is stepping down

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(Last Updated On: July 12, 2021)

The commander of U.S. and NATO forces in Afghanistan General Scott Miller is stepping down Monday in a move that marks the symbolic end of the U.S. military mission in the country.

Miller has commanded the military coalition in Afghanistan since August 2018, longer than any previous commanding general in that position and will turn over command of U.S. Forces Afghanistan to the commander of U.S. Central Command, Marine General Frank McKenzie.

NBC reported that as the head of CENTCOM, McKenzie already had authority over Afghanistan and many of the neighboring countries. He will continue to work from CENTCOM headquarters in Tampa, Florida, and his forward headquarters at Al Udeid Air Base in Doha, Qatar.

Miller is expected to retire, three defense officials said, NBC reported.

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Biden: US military mission in Afghanistan will end Aug 31

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(Last Updated On: July 9, 2021)

The United States’ military mission in Afghanistan will officially end on August 31, US President Joe Biden announced Thursday during an update on the troop withdrawal process.

Biden stated a Taliban takeover of Afghanistan is “not inevitable” because the Afghan military not only outnumbers the Taliban but is much better equipped. 

He also said the US intelligence community’s recent warning that Afghanistan’s government is on the verge of collapse is “wrong”. 

Biden’s remarks during a press briefing at the White House came after he and Vice President Kamala Harris met with national security leaders for an update on the troop withdrawal process.

He also said: “We did not go to Afghanistan to nation-build, and it is the right and the responsibility of Afghan people alone to decide their future and how they want to run their country.” 

Biden announced that the US is implementing an evacuation plan to withdraw Afghans who assisted the American military.

Biden said Washington would begin flights this month to relocate Afghan interpreters and other personnel who aided the US military – as well as their families – to third-party countries while they await expedited visa processing to move to the United States.

“There is a home for you in the United States if you so choose, and we will stand with you just as you stood with us,” Biden said.

He noted that the US has already approved 2,500 special immigrant visas for Afghans who assisted the US military but said that “up until now, fewer than half have exercised their right to do that.”

There are an estimated 18,000 Afghans who qualify for the special immigrant visas.

 

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