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Bayat Foundation and Cordaid partner to help 20 SME entrepreneurs

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(Last Updated On: December 4, 2020)

The Bayat Foundation in partnership with Cordaid in Afghanistan said on Thursday they have successfully trained entrepreneurs from 20 small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) in Kabul in the past year.

Head of Cordaid in Afghanistan, Jaap van Hierden said they will continue with the program, to help young entrepreneurs develop their business skills, grow their businesses and train them in the processes around job seekers and hiring of staff.

Representatives from Bayat Foundation and Cordaid both said these entrepreneurs will be able to grow their businesses if they apply the lessons they have learned.

Ahsanullah Aryanzai, from Bayat Foundation, said their participation in the program will continue.

“We hope that the young generation will reach their goals and select a path of development, by [taking on] big economic projects, and innovations; they have the capacity to do that,” said Aryanzai.

Meanwhile, Hamidullah Karimi, head of the entrepreneurial division at the Ministry of Industry and Commerce said the government wants to work with the private sector in order to boost SMEs.

“We as a government want to help the private sector and the private sector can also help the government.

“Without government, the private sector can not reach its full potential and without the private sector government can’t succeed in economic development,” he said.

The entrepreneurs who completed the skills development program meanwhile praised the two organizations for having helped them learn the skills needed to succeed.
“It was a very nice program and we are happy because we learned many things,” said one entrepreneur.

“It is a very good program, especially if you don’t have much knowledge about trade and business practices,” another entrepreneur said.

Cordaid has been active in Afghanistan since 2001 and works to help achieve a stable and peaceful Afghanistan. The organization works in six thematic areas: inclusive peace, security and justice, humanitarian aid, resilience, private sector development, and healthcare.

The Bayat Foundation was established in 2006 and has since helped rebuild Afghanistan as well as deliver hope and support to the neediest and most at-risk Afghans.

Active in numerous sectors in the country, the Bayat Foundation also provides food and clothing to the needy; maternity care for women before and during childbirth and to newborn babies; orphan care and education; competitive sports to challenge the youth; and entrepreneurship programs for widows, women and youth.

The Foundation’s goal is to rekindle a healthy and hopeful base so that all Afghans have the opportunity to prosper.

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Kabul jolted by powerful explosion

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(Last Updated On: April 20, 2021)

A powerful explosion tore across Kabul on Tuesday night in what appears to have been a targeted attack on a convoy of vehicles belonging to the National Directorate of Security (NDS).

The incident happened just before 10pm on the Airport Road in the city.

According to sources, the convoy was targeted in PD15 in Charahi Shahid on Airport Road.

There have been no reports of casualties so far but damage was caused to buildings in the area.

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CENTCOM chief in midst of ‘detailed planning’ for counterterrorism ops

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(Last Updated On: April 20, 2021)

Carrying out airstrikes against terrorist hideouts in Afghanistan without a US troop presence in the country will be difficult but “not impossible”, the commander of US Central Command General Frank McKenzie said on Tuesday. 

Speaking to the House Armed Services Committee, McKenzie said he is in the midst of “detailed planning” for options for so-called “over the horizon” forces, or forces positioned elsewhere in the region that could continue counterterrorism strikes in Afghanistan. 

He said he plans to give Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin those options by the end of the month.

“If you leave Afghanistan and you want to go back in to conduct these kinds of operations, there are three things you need to do: you need to find the target, you need to fix the target, and you need to be able to finish the target,” McKenzie said. 

“The first two require heavy intelligence support. If you’re out of the country, and you don’t have the ecosystem that we have there now, it will be harder to do that. It is not impossible to do that.”

McKenzie’s testimony comes almost a week after President Joe Biden announced he was withdrawing all US troops from Afghanistan and that they would all be home by September 11 – the 20th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks on the United States. 

According to The Hill, Biden’s decision came despite repeated statements from US military officials that the Taliban was not yet upholding its end of a deal made during the Trump administration to reduce violence and break from al-Qaeda, as well as warnings about the potential for chaos in Afghanistan that could allow an al-Qaeda resurgence should US troops withdraw.

Meanwhile, McKenzie’s comments about the difficulty of intelligence gathering without a troop presence echo comments last week from CIA Director William Burns, who told senators the ability to collect intelligence on threats in Afghanistan will “diminish” with a US military withdrawal, the Hill reported.

On Tuesday, McKenzie also said he continues to have “grave doubts” about the Taliban’s reliability in upholding its commitments under the deal signed last year.

McKenzie declined to tell lawmakers how he advised Biden as the president deliberated the withdrawal, but said he had “multiple opportunities” to provide Biden with his perspective.

The Hill reported that speaking broadly about options to continue strikes once US troops leave, McKenzie said surveillance drones could be positioned in a place where they can reach Afghanistan “in a matter of minutes” or ”perhaps much further away.”

“We will look at all the countries in the region, our diplomats will reach out, and we’ll talk about places where we could base those resources,” he said. 

“Some of them may be very far away, and then there would be a significant bill for those types of resources because you’d have to cycle a lot of them in and out. That is all doable, however.”

Right now, McKenzie added, the United States does not have any basing agreements with Uzbekistan, Tajikistan, Kyrgyzstan or other countries surrounding Afghanistan.

McKenzie also said there are a “variety of ways” to strike targets, including long-range precision fire missiles, manned raids or manned aircraft.

“There are problems with all three of those options, but there’s also opportunities with all three of those options,” he said.

“I don’t want to make light of it. I don’t want to put on rose-colored glasses and say it’s going to be easy to do. I can tell you that the U.S. military can do just about anything. And we’re examining this problem with all of our resources right now to find a way to do it in the most intelligent, risk-free manner that we can.”

US Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin, Secretary of State Anthony Blinken, Director of National Intelligence Avril Haines and Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff General Mark Milley are also scheduled to brief the full House and Senate behind closed doors later Tuesday on Biden’s plan for Afghanistan.

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Ghani launches major development program of 1,000 projects

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(Last Updated On: April 20, 2021)

President Ashraf Ghani on Tuesday officially launched the start of construction of 1,000 infrastructure projects across the country.

Addressing an event to mark Good Governance and Human Resources Week, Ghani stated that the projects would be implemented in Herat, Kandahar, Balkh, and Nangarhar provinces at a cost of 5.7 billion AFN.

According to Ghani, development projects such as the construction of dams, roads, and bridges are crucial for improving the lives of people.

“Completion of these 1,000 projects is important for the trust of people and will be implemented across Afghanistan. Every citizen has a fundamental right to have access to services so that we can fulfill the government’s commitments to meet the challenges of the people,” Ghani said.

Highlighting the increasing violence in Afghanistan, Ghani claimed that the Taliban still continue to destroy infrastructure in Afghanistan.

According to him, the group has damaged infrastructure in Afghanistan worth $1 billion.

“The Taliban has destroyed dozens of bridges and culverts,” he said.

Ghani called on the Taliban to plant “flowers” instead of detonating mines.

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